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Villages Of Cyprus - Mesana Village

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Information on Mesana Village

Mesana Village                                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Mesana Village is located in the Paphos District of Cyprus. The village lies close to Agios Ioannis, Salamiou, Arminou and Filousa Villages.

The village is built at a height of 478 metres above sea level.

There are two legends as to how Mesana Village acquired it's name. The first legend states that the name came from the position of the village, which lies in the middle of Salamiou and Arminou Villages. Meson in Greek means middle and the name slowly changed over the years to Mesana. The second legend, and the more probable, was that the first inhabitants of the village came from the Messana area of Greece.

Mesana Village has a long history dating back to Medieval times. The Agios Georgios Monastery, which lies a short distance on the outskirts of the village, is one of the oldest monasteries in the area. The monastery was built in the late 15th century and has been restored by the Cyprus Antiquities Department under the supervision of UNESCO, and is also listed on the UNESCO Heritage List.

The Agios Tychikos Church is the main church in use by the village and is located next to the old school. The church was built in 1900 on top of the ruins of a previous church, also named after the saint, Agios Tychikos.

The population of the village has fluctuated over the years, mainly due to the availability of employment. The most populated period of the village was during the 1940's when the population reached over 300 permanent residents. The village has a much reduced population of only 70 permanent residents today.

Mesana Village has a long history as a wine producing village, which helped the village prosper. The village was also only one of five villages producing sultanas in the Paphos District of Cyprus. The land surrounding the village was once mainly covered with vineyards which stretched as far as the eye could see. The vineyards provided the main employment of the village, with most of the grapes used for wine and Zivania. The surplus grapes were used to make Cypriot delicacies such as Soutzouko and Palouze, with the rest of the grapes sold locally or used for local consumption.

The village also had many olive trees, with the olives used for processing into olive oil. Almond trees were also cultivated, but to a much lesser extent.

Mesana Village managed to escape serious damage in the 1953 Paphos earthquake, with just a few homes still bearing cracks in the walls.

The infrastructure of the village is being refurbished with new cobbled streets and stone walls, and has become an attractive place for Agrotourism holidays.

Mesana Village                                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Mesana Village                                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Mesana Village                                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Mesana Village                                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Agios Tychikos Church                                                          Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

© CyprusExpat.co.uk

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