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Villages Of Cyprus - Kellaki Village

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Information on Kellaki Village

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village is located in the Limassol District of Cyprus and lies close toKlonari, Vikla, Parastio Kellaki and Sanida villages.

The village has a long history, which began as early as the 3rd Century, when a christian monk began to build a monastery in the area. The village developed under the Frankish rule and became the administration centre for the surrounding villages.

The name of the village, according to legend, came from a christian monk who came to the area in the 3rd century to build a monastery. The Christians at the time encouraged monks to travel to remote areas and build monasteries for monks, in order to spread the Christian religion.

The monk began the construction of his monastery by building a "Kellaki", a single cell where he could live and pray. Later more cells were added, called "Kellions", to accommodate more monks.

The village was always referred to over time as Kellaki Village referring back to it's origins of the first single cell.

The population of Kellaki Village has fluctuated over the years. In the 1800's the average number of permanent residents recorded were just over 300, the numbers fell the following years due to the lack of employment and education facilities. The draw of the large city of Limassol nearby became a major factor in the decline of the population. The opportunity for year long employment and further education facilities dealt a major blow to the village.

In recent years there has been a revival in the number of permanent residents in the village, reaching a total of just over 350 permanent residents. The main reason for the rise in the population is the modern road to Limassol and the surrounding areas. The travelling time to reach other destinations has been reduced, so commuting to Limassol for instance is an ideal option for many residents.

The population increases at the weekends, when many residents who now live elsewhere, have maintained their original family homes visit, as well as during school holidays, public holidays and during festivals.

Kellaki Village is built at an average height of 685 metres above sea level. The height allows for a cool refreshing climate during the long hot Cyprus summers, as well as providing relatively mild winters, with mild snowfalls may occur.

The height of the village meant the villagers are able to cultivate many vineyards, with the grapes produced processed into wine and zivania. Soutzoukos and palouze is also produced from the grape juice. The village also has a large fruit and vegetable crop, with the village famous for the quality of it's tomatoes.

The main church of Kellaki Village is the Agios Georgios Church. The church is located at the top of a hill overlooking the village and presents a dominant feature of the village. The church was built during the 18th century and received extensive renovations in 2000 in order to repair earthquake damage which had occurred over the years.

The Agia Marina Chapel is located next to the Kellaki Village cemetery. The church was built in 1740 and major renovation work was carried out in 1840. In later years, the original church was destroyed and the present modern church was built on the original church site.

The ruins of the Chapel of Archangel Michael are located on the southeast outskirts of the village. The original chapel was built in the 12th century in the Byzantine style. The chapel has fallen into disrepair over the years due to a lack of funding for necessary renovations. The future of the chapel has now been secured with funds from the Cyprus Government and the Greek Orthodox Church now in place to proceed with urgent repairs.

A couple of kilometres to the southeast of Kellaki Village is the location of the Women's Holy Monastery of Zoodochou Pigis (Panagia Glossa). The monastery was built in 1975 on the original site of a 15th century chapel. The monastery is named after the Panagia of Glossas, the Saint of Speech, after the icon of the Virgin Mary which is situated in the monastery. The icon is believed to help cure speech problems.

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Agios Georgios Church In Kellaki Village                                 Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Kellaki Village                                                                Photo © CyprusExpat.co.uk

Photos Of Kellaki Village

Kellaki Village Images

Zoodochou Pigis Monastery (Panagia Glossa) In Kellaki Village

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